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How (Un)Healthy Is All Of The Buzz Anyway?

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BOSTON - MAY 27:  David DeJesus #9 of the Kansas City Royals hits an RBI double in the sixth inning as Jason Varitek #33 of the Boston Red Sox catches on May 27, 2010 at Fenway Park in Boston, Massachusetts.  (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
BOSTON - MAY 27: David DeJesus #9 of the Kansas City Royals hits an RBI double in the sixth inning as Jason Varitek #33 of the Boston Red Sox catches on May 27, 2010 at Fenway Park in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
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How healthy can this really be for David DeJesus? I know, I know. It's a part of the current sports culture to have a constant buzz of rumors and conjecture floating about our sports radio, television and Internet portals. Still, I question the health of it all.

Picture this in another scenario: imagine the media around you questioning whether or not your wife was going to leave you for another man (or vice versa) on a constant basis? Picture trying to work if everyone around you was wondering whether or not your boss was going to replace you? Those are high anxiety and nothing I would ever want to live through. The threat of those things happening without the media shouting about them is enough for some, but to live through it on the front of the local sports page is another.

I love the rumors as much as the next guy. In fact, I'm addicted to it at these times of year when the haves and have-nots find themselves looting one another to stock the present (or future). So I realize that I contribute to it myself, whenever I write about someone or when I click on a link to another article. But there's also that part of me that's curious how a guy like DeJesus holds up to it. I'm sure in the press conference, he'll just nod that it's part of the game and what he has to deal with. But there's no way the husband just says 'Well, it's just a part of being married' in the above scenario.

I wonder if the performances of some well-known athletes are significantly changed because of the constant frenzy of today's media-saturated culture. It's an interesting thought, if nothing else, since we must know that nothing is going to change in the near future. We're all addicted so the trade targets of the sports world simply must get used to it -- no matter how healthy or unhealthy things may get.