clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Former Chiefs Coach Marty Schottenheimer On Raider Week

New, 4 comments

Former Chiefs head coach Marty Schottenheimer talks about Raider week.

via <a href="http://assets.sbnation.com/imported_assets/75041/610x_medium.jpg">assets.sbnation.com</a>
via assets.sbnation.com

The Kansas City Chiefs and Oakland Raiders have been rivals for some time but that rivalry was taken to new heights in the 1990s with Marty Schottenheimer as the head coach of the Chiefs. He demanded that his players dislike the Raiders as he did and soon the Raider-hater culture was born.

Marty talked this week with Kevin Kietzmann of 810 WHB's Between the Lines and offered up his thoughts on Raider week.

"It was different," Marty said of Raider week. "I'd walk in there in the meetings during Raider week and before I could open my mouth the guys would look around and say, 'Hey guys, the coach is here. Let's go!. It's Raider week!"

As someone who's best memories are the '90s Chiefs, I can remember this feeling Raider week meant something a lot more than it does now but that's because both teams were actually good. Of course that didn't stop Marty from going 18-3 against them those years.

Here's what Marty had to say when asked about his dislike for the Raiders.

"I have always just been very uncomfortable about the fact that the Raiders management has continued to steadfastly to feel as though they're better than the rest. And I'm not necessarily just talking about the on the field aspect of it. Al Davis made signfiicant contributions to the American Football League.

The thing that always troubled me is that they have these issues there were being ovted on during the league meetings for one thing or another. If there were 28 teams, there would be 27-1 and the Raiders would be the team that would vote in the opposite way to the unanimous sense of everyone else. Of course the roles were changed and ultimately would happen is that Al Davis was going to go and in effect keep these issues from being unanimous and that always bothered me.

He recalls one game that occurred before he became head coach in '89 -- the Chiefs were pretty miserable during the '80s -- that has stuck with him to this day.

I remember one game -- it occurred before I became the coach -- but I remember watching it and studying it on tape. The game where the Raiders came into Arrowhead and were rather belligerent about the way they were going about their business and I think they won rather handily and that really kind of stuck with me. I've always thought the league was more important as a whole than any individual team and I don't think the Raiders ever felt that way.

He also shared his philosophy on how to beat the Raiders and it's very entertaining. Essentially, keep playing hard and the Raiders will eventually beat themselves.

As a football team there was a philosophy relative to how you beat the Raiders. That was you went into the game with the understanding that the first half would come and go and you would want to stay in the contest but if you stayed the course into the fourth quarter you would find a way to somehow beat them or they'd beat themselves and you'd end up the winner anyway. That's the way they functioned in my view.

I think you could bring Marty in as a motivational speaker during every Raiders week and he'd get the troops fired up to the point they'd be ready to break out of the locker room. Marty never hid his feelings for the Raiders and I think that will be one of the lasting memories of him in Kansas City.